Montressor, most beautiful village of the Touraine ~ Hall of Carders


In the plus beaux village of Montressor can be found the exquisite Halle des Cardeux or Hall of the Carders. The name recalls the historical importance of the wool trade to the surrounding area. Built in the eighteenth century, in the heart of Montresor, the building was once the granary of the merchants of the village as well as housing the wool market.

Today it is used as a venue for local events and art exhibitions and hosts a permanent exhibition on the history of Montressor and the surrounding area. Unfortunately, I have yet to visit the exhibition…one day though…

Below is an image  of the Hall c1940s from my collection – it shows well the mansard roof ~ a style of architecture which is popular in the Region and, indeed, across France. A mansard roof is one which has two slopes on each of its sides and has dormer windows inserted thus allowing maximum use of the attic space for living accommodation or working space. Its name is a corruption of  the surname of François Mansart a C17th French architect who, while not inventing it, extensively used this building technique.

Why not look out for further examples of this style of architecture when you are out and about? Further images of the people, events and buildings of Montressor are available at a superb site dedicated to the village – just click here.

Advertisements

About Jim McNeill

I am a blogger on 'The Social History of the Touraine region of France (37)' and also 'The Colonial History of Pennsylvania and the life & Family of William Penn'. I am a Director of Fresh Ground Group Ltd.
This entry was posted in 18th Century, 20th Century, architecture, Montresor, Wool and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s