Traditional woman’s bonnet of the Touraine


In the book I recently purchased, Visage de la Touraine (published 1948), there is this sketch by a G. Royvan of a traditional bonnet as worn by women of the Touraine (see end of this blog). I know that I have seen bonnets being worn in old photos and postcards of women in the Touraine but this design is more for Sunday-best, perhaps?

Generally, I think, the function of women’s simple linen bonnets is rather curious. I presume they were cheap to make, easy to wash and maintain and could be made from old materials such a sheets. They would also provide covering for one’s hair as well as keeping the head warm. They will also, of course, have had a role as a fashion item. They were also important for their use as head coverings when women went to Christian churches and chapels.

So, I did a search on Google and came up with this information:

“A taste for simpler fabrics in the 1780’s, anticipated the more democratic styles that followed the French Revolution. Cotton was introduced as a fashion fabric. Simple cotton house bonnets ornamented with a separate ribbon became fashionable for all echelons of society. The elite still wore hats (sometimes atop the bonnet) with tall crowns adorned with wide silk ribbon bows. Hats fell from favour after the French Revolution. They were associated with the upper classes and it was considered stylish to be democratic.”

 

Touraine Bonnet c. 1930s

 

 

 

About Jim McNeill

I am a blogger on 'The Social History of the Touraine region of France (37)' and also 'The Colonial History of Pennsylvania and the life & Family of William Penn'. I am a Director of Fresh Ground Group Ltd.
This entry was posted in French Revolution, Women's History and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Traditional woman’s bonnet of the Touraine

  1. Pingback: More on bonnets of the Touraine | Social history in the Touraine ~ Central France

  2. Pingback: Further early C20th images of women of the Touraine | Social history in the Touraine ~ Central France

  3. Pingback: Young women of Vouvray in traditional Touraine costume ~ 1906 | Social history in the Touraine ~ Central France

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s